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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)
that struck me about this conversation is something that we learn about harvey milk. when he was first elected, he understood the significance of his election. i would like to share with you a part of what he said. it goes, the hope speech often talk about. this is what he said to use his own words: "two days after i was elected i got a phone call and the voice was quite young. it was from al tuna, pennsylvania. the person said things. you have to elected a people so that young child and thousands of people know that there is hope for a better tomorrow." without hope, gays, blacks, seniors, the "ss" give up. without hope life is not worth living. harvey closed, and you and you and you. you have to give them hope. as i think about this, i really think that that is what we are talking about. in this measure. we are talking about giving hope to so many people who live in parts of this country, parts of the world where they cannot fathom being true to who they are; they cannot fathom being honest to themselves let alone other people about their sexual orientation. something that struck me about
. the challenge to us is to remember what we learned when we first entered this movement, that you never elect someone to make change happen for you. you elect somebody to make it a little easier for your movement to keep on making change after. and so, brothers and sisters, i implore you tonight, have a good time, party caressed well, then get right back on the battlefield tuesday morning because we took our democracy back and we ain't giving it up to nobody. thank you and god bless. fire it up. fire it up. fire it up! god bless you all. >> that was president of the naacp, benjamin jealous, speaking at the peace ball, voices of hope and resistance come here in washington, d.c. on sunday night. we will be back with more from the peace ball couldn't angela davis, sonia sanchez and others in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> sweet honey in the rock performing at the peace ball last night. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from washington, d.c., bringing you special coverage of today's inauguration as hundreds of thousands gath
that they're willing to work with this president? now that he has won two elections, and clearly the last one? >> you know, i hope so. we talk off camera -- >> you don't sound confident. >> well, here is the thing there are a lot of good folks in the republican caucus. i want to say that. and i mean that. but once they start voting, will they vote their conscience or will they vote what the tea party extremists demand. and that is the question. that's a question they have to answer. now some of their leaders said we're going to give -- we're going to take him out. our key agenda is to take out obama and make him a one-term president. they failed. i hope enough republicans are out there to do what is right now. >> congressman, four years ago tonight, there were a group of republicans that met at a restaurant. >> yes, there was. >> that set the course of obstruction. and they said we're going to say no to everything. what kind of dinner are they going to have tonight? >> is crow on the menu? >> i said that earlier today in our broadcast. they should probably be serving that today. but the p
the election of the first african-american president. president obama is only the 16th sitting chief executive to be returned to office. he is the first president since dwight eisenhower to win two consecutive elections with more than 51% of the popular vote. he won for the 372 electoral votes to mitt romney's 206 and spent part of the morning at the white house having coffee with bipartisan leadership. >> this is the second time the president had his inauguration on the celebration of martin luther king, jr. and it's actually a ceremonial event. the 20th amendment to the constitution mandates that newly elected mandates take place on january 20th and several times that happened on the sunday. and followed by the pomp and pageantry on the following monday. >> both president obama and vice president biden took their official oaths of office why yesterday. >> i barack hussein obama swear -- >> supreme court justice john roberts swore in the first family. justice sotomayor did the honor at the vice president's residence at the united states naval observe tore in washington. >> and both families a
progress in the last election. >> john: here is a comment from the present that should resonate with any remaining mitt romney fans. >> obama: we do not believe that in this country freedom is reserved for the lucky or happiness for the view. we recognize that no matter how responsibly we live our lives any one of us at any time may face a job loss or a sudden illness or a home swept away in a terrible storm. the commitments we make to each other through medicare, and medicaid, and social security, these things do not sap our initiative. they strengthen us. they do not make us a nation of takers they free us to take the risks that make this country great. >> john: david, that couldn't have been more pointed if he turned to paul ryan and said that line directly to him. do you think he was sending a message across the bell? >> i hope he's sending a message. a lot of progressives look at that and say wait a second, is that the same president who was willing to support the change in social security, or is he going to stand firm. the rhetoric sounds good but how does the president act? what a
. and the most elite of the elite are the group who have been re-elected. >> mm-hmm. >> and so i think that this is their chance, this is obama's chance to really say put it out there and say this is -- the first time is really -- this is what i want to do, and the second time is, like, this is what i want to be. and i think that in a case of a black president it's even more important because the first time around it was jubilant, it was the first black president, it was so exciting. the second time around is this wasn't a fluke. this guy really did it. he did a good job, and the american people reaffirmed that he did a good job and re-elected him. and so many-in some way because he's a black president i think that the second inaugural for him is more important than the first. >> well, that is the reason for the second inaugural. let's go to nbc's peter alexander because peter was there for that d -- the more intimate inaugural, if you will, having been sworn in some 35 minutes ago, give us some details. >> reporter: alex, this ceremony lasted barely a minute, the president surrounded
. in this conversation we have the rear picture -- rare picture of king advising johnson how he's going to get re-elected in 1968 by getting the southern blacks registered. johnson is advising king -- johnson, who detests demonstrating in the streets, as most elected officials did -- is giving king clues about how he can make those demonstrations more effective. here we go. sound, lights, camera. someone let me know whether we have it or we don't. because i'm going to keep on talking. at any rate a close working relationship became even closer as civil rights movement and people in congress tried to put an end, finally, for all time, they hoped, black citizens being denied the right to vote. the first crisis came at the edmund pet tiss bridge -- pettis bridge in selma, alabama. king's lieutenants started off on a march from the town of selma, across the bridge with the stated intent of marching to montgomery. none of them had toothpaste or backpack -- a few of them had backpacks. it was a challenge. the idea was to produce a confrontation. and it did. i'm sure all of us have seen the pictures of sherr ri
at 12:01 or thereabouts, everyone in the process will be looking to their next election except for the president. so his clock moves faster than anyone els as he looks broader and farther, everyone else with a stake in the system will be looking narrower and more closely at their next election. so it'll be very tough. there's also the mathematical reality reality. four more years and the hardest job in the world means you have four more years of incredibly different problems. i promise you when we watch his successor drive up pennsylvania avenue in four years, we'll be talking about something we will not mention today. some unforeseen crisis. >> andrea mitchell what are you looking for over the next four years? >> you have a president who is actually energized by a feeling of possibilities. i think the way he took on guns that whole issue, that was not discussed at all during the campaign. he responded to the crisis. one of his opponents, ted cruz, the new tea-party supported senator said on "meet the press" yesterday, well he exploited it within minutes. t
backing the party. they say there's election commission in pakistan which will hold free and fair elections. kamal in o live to islamabad. what is the latest on the trouble in pashawar? >> i just spoke to our contact who told me the protesters who brought the body to the governor's house are in a meeting with the authorities with their demand that the perpetrators of the crime, that there should be justice, and that their perfume should be lifted so people can resume their normal lives. however, so far, there's no word from the government or the authorities. the incident took place a couple days back. these people were killed and dumped. because it was curfew, nobody could retrieve the bodies. there are questions asked to who carried out the attacks. some of the people who were killed, there were family paramilitaryhe pair liber forces. there are suspicions that the attack could have been carried out by an militant islamic grou. sometimes they attack civilians and military members. >> does anyone know where the prime minister is? >> nobody has seen the prime minister in public sin
is moving to the left very quickly. president obama's election has emboldened many liberals and funding taxpayer abortion, legalized narcotics and gay marriage. overseas the same thing is going on as the left is surging. in rome on sunday a group of gay activists stripped off their searches revealing the words in gay we trust. the pope was in the middle of a public prayer as the protesters tried to shout him down. >> [shouting] >> go with a message to pope to shut up his mouth and not to give his ad vices to those people who decide to legalize gay marriage. >> bill: italian police carried the protesters away but chances are nothing much will happen to them. in france the new socialist president has vowed to enact gay marriage. that has angered some french citizens including the sizeable muslim nation. so also last sunday they took to the streets saying they want traditional marriage to be upheld in france. >> whenever so many people are in the streets, it shows us that it's a law that's not accepted by lots of people. the thing they should do is a eleven dumb. then we will know what peo
of the world in this election in whh he did well with minorities and younger voters and so to the extent that his second election ratified the new obama coalition and the new shape of the electorate he so too hopes his second term will speak to that. >> rose: we conclude this evening with part one of a two-part conversation about the presidency of barack obama and the next four years joined by doris kearns goodwin, jon meacham, bob woodward, bob caro, and michael beschloss. >> i know it's the consensus that we're -- barack obama has to do is get along with the republicans. i'd like to say something about that. president obama is fond of quoting-- and if he isn't, i am-- martin luther king's statement "the moral arc of the universe bends slowly but it bends towards justice." in the first term, president obama did bend that moral arc. he got health insurance, peace of mind for more than 30 million people. the bill may be floored but it's passed. in the second term i see a sort of differently. everyone's attacking the moral arc of justice-- social security medicare everyone's saying we have
the republicans so that people will be angry with them. am i wrong? he has been doing that since elections day, i wrote a column ever since september pointing out entire strategy for the fiscal cliff was to split the republicans. it had nothing to do his offers had nothing to do with solving the fiscal issue or solving the debt. he showed nothing to solve the debt since he was elected in 2008. he appoints a commission two years later and ignored it he has never talked about any structure turley cuts in entitle wants. he has no interest in that. he wants the entitlement state. if you want a european style entitlement state you need european style taxation. that's all he is interested in. but his strategy with fiscal cliff as is his strategy wonderful the debt ceiling is to split fracture and therefore neuter republicans in the house because that is all that stands between him and total dominance of washington in his second term. he wants a return to 2009-2010 when he had control of both houses he had a super majority in the senate. huge majority in the house. and revolutionized healthcare and pass
. it was relatively easy it was unanimous that george washington had been elected president. the first thing they had to do was notify washington he needed to come to take his oath of office. it took a little while for presidents of the united states in those days to get to wherever the federal government was so they had a couple of weeks to work things out. well the first thing they did was to write an oath for everybody else to take including the vice president of the united states. congress write it is oath that every other person who works for the government from military to judges to the legislators. that is an oath written by congress and it's changed over the centuries. but the oath the president takes is unique. it's in the constitution and it's never changed. so the question was where are we going to swear in the president of the united states? well congress is meeting in federal hall on wall street. and it was a nice building. the house had the bigger room downstairs and the senate had the smaller room upstairs. and they said the president should be sworn in in our chamber. that was fine ex
the iranian or the midden eastern arab spring, and the american election, and the third is the pleasuring of -- blurring of fact and opinion. we lived in an era require to this where we thought there was a clear line between when journalists were presenting factual information from a neutral or fair perspective and when we were hearing opinions. that has broken down and those three changes we think have been driven by a variety of things, not the least of which is the technological revolution with we have undergone. >> host: professor, have we lost important gatekeepers of news in your view? >> guest: i think that is one of the central themes of the book, which is that we now live in a world that we call somewhat nerdly multiaxiality. what we mean by that term, the ways in which information can become public information and paid attention to by a lot of people is much more fluid, there are many more gates than there used to be. i argue you don't need gates because the walls have come down. so where we get information from, what becomes newsworthy or important, what goes
president being re-elected, having a second inauguration today? >> i believe that he would have been very happy to know that america has moved to a place that they are able to elect a president, not based on the color of his skin, but as he talked about, the content of his character. and that, he would be very happy about. i think the state of where we are, divided on so many different things, unfortunately, that's unacceptable. we must become united, united states of america, but i think the majority of the people are saying, listen, let's do away with these old habits, these old things that need to be dead and gone, and move on to really bringing our nation together. and i think he would say that. time to move on and make it better and get it right. >> well, i'm very excited about tonight. looking forward to your performance. and if you do need me, i will be in close proximity and available. >> start warming up. warm up, mate. >> all right, buddy. >> good to see you. >> good to see you, take care. >> i tell you what, stevie wonder has a very good english accent. he had it right down to
governors after the election went to johnson and said, please stop sending this stuff to congress making us look too liberal to get re-elected. >> all right. michael, thank you very much. >> thanks. great to see you all, guys. >> all right. >>> next, what if anything can manti te'o learn when and if he finally comes clean from lance armstrong's confession, aka, how to not be a complete and utter loser? lance is next in the spin as we roll on. it's friday, january 18th. i didn't think it was anything. i had pain in my abdomen... it just wouldn't go away. i was spotting, but i had already gone through menopause. these symptoms may be nothing... but they could be early warning signs of a gynecologic cancer, such as cervical, ovarian, or uterine cancer. feeling bloated for no reason. that's what i remember. seeing my doctor probably saved my life. warning signs are not the same for everyone. if you think something's wrong... see your doctor. ask about gynecologic cancer. and get the inside knowledge. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was jus
of the world in this election in which he did well with minorities and younger voters so to the extent that his second election ratified the new obama coalition and the new shape of the electorate he so, too, hopes his second term will speak to that. and i think that was an interesting part of this speech but if you're in a republican hearing this when he talks about collective action they hear big government, when he talks about investment they hear taxes and when he talks about takers which he did in the speech, that's a loaded word. it aims right at paul ryan who talked about takers versus makers, the takers being the one who receive federal benefits but pay no federal income tax. that's a shot. that's not just language that's slipped in. so that's the sense in which this had a combative -- there were a few barbs in this speech. >> one of the moments in the campaign when the president was office balance was when he said you didn't build it, talking about small business. that was one of the big themes of the speech saying you need collective action in order to get anything done. again, not ne
with how many -- how much diversity they showed. i tune in every election and i watched the whole thing today, and i was impressed to see such a broad representation of latinos, african american leaders, it was really interesting. maybe it is an indicator of the historical nature of having a president of this type of background. the other thing, i thought michelle looked incredible. i heard one of the previous colors was not quite impressed. i am not much of a fan of pop music per se, but the singing that kelly clarkson did at the swearing-in was incredible. she actually gave me chills. it was extremely well organized. i was really impressed with it overall. i wish the present -- president the absolute best. >> we will continue to take your calls for a couple of minutes. on the right, the d.c. convention center. one of two balls happening inside their. the president is about five minutes from coming on stage. we will also see a dance from vice president biden and jill biden. also trying to get a couple of for you -- of tweets for you. we appreciate the tweets. we will try to get to as m
elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white house. the oath administered by the chief justice john roberts, jr. the public swearing-in and all the pomp and circumstance that go with it were put off until today and what a day it is. the temperature right now is in the high 30s. the sky is clear, a brilliant winter's day in the nation's capital. people are pouring into the national mall to witness a day of history. the first family began the day by attending services at st. john's church. that's right across the street from the white house. that's a long-standing tradition for presidents on inauguration day. joining me now in our cbs coverage is bob schieffer, our chief washington correspondent and anchor of ""face the nation."" bob, what
the election against the incumbent, and at issue was the iran contra crisis, where americans were held for over 400 days after a group of islamic militants and students took over the embassy. as he was giving his inauguration address, the militants were being released. this is about 25 minutes. [applause] >> governor, are you prepared to take the constitutional oath? >> i am. >> raise your right hand and repeat after me. i, ronald reagan, do solemnly swear, that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states and will come to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states. so help you god. >> so help me, god. [applause] ♪ ["hail to the chief" plays] >> >> the president of the united states. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. senator hatfield, mr. justice, mr. president, vice president bush, vice president mondale, senator baker, speaker o'neill, reverend moomaw, and my fellow citizens, to a few of us here today this is a solemn and most momentous occasion, and yet in the history of our nation it is a commonplace occurrence. t
to go against me for re-election. you are going to go against me on the vietnam war. >> guest: yes. king now i understand what courage it took to take the stand that he did and i understand more about why he hesitated. faretta was very much involved in the antiwar movement from an early stage but again she was not the public figure so he could send her essentially to speak for him. >> host: again he proved dr. king right. >> guest: i think so. this was one of the ways -- i think he's a visionary. i think he understood the connection between the anti-colonial movements going on around the world and understood how the cold war had prevented us from seeing -- we were on the wrong side, that because the communist movement had identified itself with anti-colonialism many of these nationalists wanted to have the assistance of the soviet union so we saw it in cold war terms. >> host: my enemy's enemy is my friend. you left the country during the vietnam era. why? >> guest: well, for me looking back it wasn't that difficult a choice because i knew i wasn't going to go into the military. >> host:
" former speechwriter for president jimmy carter writes "now, well it's almost as if he has won re-election and knows he will never have to run again and hears the clock ticking on his last chance to use the power of the presidency on the causes he cares about." dan lothian joins us from the national cathedral where the national prayer service will begin in the next hour so the president's liberal town, i ne thinking it won't smooth things over with republicans. >> reporter: it could present a challenge for the president. some republicans looked at yesterday's remarks as a chance to essentially start over with a clean slate looking forward to the next four years, but there was sort of this criticism pushed back on the president's tone, you heard from senator john mccain saying that, quote, he would have like to have seen some outreach in the president's marks, senator john thune of south dakota calling it "mostly 30,000 foot stuff" he, referring to the president, "wasn't doing the kind of outreach he needs to do if he wants to get things accomplished in the second term" and senator susan co
an office boy and get him elected to senate. other senators called him the senator from prendergast. he squeaks in to get reelected in 1940 and then they elevated him, not because he was qualified to be president, as emitted over and over again, but because he did not have a lot of enemies and he was very pliable. if wallace had been in there, there would have been no atomic bomb, and no nuclear arms race, and very possibly no cold war. wallace could see the world through the eyes of our adversaries. he understood the soviets. he understood the chinese. >> he was an anglophobe too. roosevelt was as well. he repeatedly told his son, we are not going to be played as a good time charlie as we were in world war i. >> he also campaigned with african americans at a time of jim crow, and went to africa. >> he was shocked. he said the british empire said these people back a hundred years. >> you made the movie born on the fourth of july. you made platoon. and now have written the untold history of the united states and done a showtime series. what is most important, do you feel, that has not be
is not the interim appointee, it's the election of a new senator in the special election. that's what we need to focus on. >> schieffer: i take it will be a democrat? >> it will be a democrat. the. >> pelley: governor patrick, thank you for joining us. we have in the capitol rotunda a very special guest today, valerie jarrett, senior advisor to the president and i day air is the person in washington who has known the president and first lady longest, being a long-time friend of both in chicago. ms. jarrett, great of you to be with us, thank you so much. >> it's a pleasure. it's a pleasure to be here. it's a terrific day for america. is. >> pelley: i have to believe that you were involved in the president's speech today. he must have run it by you. he runs nearly everything by you. >> (laughs) >> pelley: and i wonder. >> what do you any the president wanted us to take from that speech? one thing that was the take-home message? >> well, i think part of what he wanted to do today is to lay out the vision of our founding fathers as basic values of principals that guide us and so what i heard when
back, fdr broke the unwritten code of serving more than two terms. he was elected to four terms. in today's modern age, could we have more than two terms for any president? guest: great question. >> you worked for ronald reagan. if his health was better, of course, would he have run for a third term? guest: i doubt it. he talked about it after he left office. he was going to campaign for appeal of that amendment. he thought the american people should be able to vote for anyone wanted to vote for. it is very difficult to imagine after eight years of office -- we've used up our presidents. that is why this string of two- term presidents is really so unusual. we have a string of one-term presidencies before that. that became the norm. host: let me share with ronald reagan said in january of 1987. state of union address. there was the iran-contra sc andal. [video clip] >> i have one major regret. i took a risk with our action in regards to iran. it did not work. for that, i accept full responsibility. it was not wrong to try to save lives. certainly, it was not wrong to try to secur
prime minister shinzo abe is on a tour of southeast asia. the newly elected leader is visiting vietnam, thailand and indonesia to strengthen ties in one of the world's economic regions. japanese companies are boosting investments here amid a territorial spam. as nhk world reports, they face a constant struggle to remain competiti competitive. >> reporter: indonesia is booming. commit is driving more than 6% a year. no wonder japanese firms i want to do business here. this sewing fact industry -- a japanesemaker of sporting gear. 60,000 leather gloves for golf and baseball are produced here every month. 12 years ago, the company chose indonesia, where labor costs were lower than in china. >> translator: making gloves requires a lot of work. so keeping labor costs low is critical for our business. >> reporter: but even in indonesia, the minimum wage has more than doubled in the last six years. how much of the extra costs they can pass on to consumers is immeasurable. >> translator: this year has been the toughest ever. i don't know how we can overcome this. >> reporter: some businesses t
on the human body of hollow impact bullets. i believe the desire for us is elected officials is to take greater steps to implemenr solutions. -- i will like your knowledge the people here in support of this legislation. there are multiple conversations happening simultaneously here not only here in san francisco but also on the state level, i want the public to knowledge the work that assemblywoman nancy skinner, a democrat from berkeley, introduced assembly bill 48. bans of the manufacture and import of any device that fires 10 rounds or more at once. -- working on sb 53, requiring an annual permit, $50 each, which includes an annual background check. not only are we doing things at the local level in san francisco but also on a statewide level. to the best of my knowledge president obama will make a presentation to -- vice president biden will make a presentation to the president next i would like to bring to your attention that on the imperative agenda i have a resolution commemorating the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation; many of you know that the emancipation proclama
to grow this economy and put people back to work. and despite that conversation, and despite the election results, the position that's been taken on the part of some house republicans is that, "no, we've got to do it our way, and if we don't, we simply won't pay america's bills." well, that can't be a position that is sustainable over time. it's not one that's good for the economy now. bes certainly not going to the kind of precedent that i want to establish not just for my presidency, but for future presidents, even if it was on the other side. democrats don't like voting for the debt ceiling when a republican is president, and yet you -- but you never saw a situation in which democrats suggested somehow that we would go ahead and default if we didn't get 100 percent of our way. that's just not how it's supposed to work. jon karl. >> thank you, mr. president. on the issue of guns, given how difficult it will be -- some would say impossible -- to get any gun control measure passed through this congress, what are you willing or able to do, using the powers of your presidency, to act withou
was elected president. that's what i decided i've got to do this book. i had written a few pieces for the "washington post" before that, so i had some basis of research, particularly on his mother. and i think that when i get home from this incredible kenyan journey, i'll have the kenyan and kansas side of the story pretty much completed. and that's when the story begins, interweaving to incredible different worlds that helped create this person. >> who came up with the title of this book? >> i did. just bouncing around, out of africa, and then i said will come out of africa, out of hawaii, out of kansas, out of indonesia, out of chicago, out of this world. and so, the book is two things. it's the world that created obama, and then how he re-created himself. so the first -- i'm not sure of the proportions yet, and it will be important for me to get it right, perhaps even the first half of the book, or not quite that much, the main character isn't even on the stage yet. and then the second half of the book is largely in chicago, was also education, california, new york, boston thro
say i am ready to start writing. i started this book the essentially the day after obama was elected president that's when i decided i'd got to do this book. i'd written a few pieces for "the washington post" before that so i had a basis of research particularly on his mother, and i think when i get home from this incredible journey i will have the kansas side of the story pretty much completed and that's where the story begins, it's a weaving these incredible worlds that helped create this person. >> host: who came up with the title? >> guest: i did. i was just bouncing around of africa and then i set out of africa come out of dalia, kansas, indonesia, chicago, out of this world. the book is two things it's the world that created obama and then how he recreate himself so i'm not sure the proportions yet and will be important to get it right but perhaps even the first half of the book the main character isn't even on the stage yet and the second act of the book is largely chicago with his education in california, new york and boston thrown in some but largely chicago and that is when
the election in november." well, those fears that democratic leaders had back then were realizeized in november. this time, democratic leaders do plan to proceed a little more carefully. senate majority leader harry reid has already told his hometown pbs station that he doesn't plan to go with what he called gyrations to pass any legislation, make senators vote for any legislation which can't get through the republican-controlled house. and guess what, folks, the house is going to be a challenge. >> people in kansas are not looking for new laws out of washington. they're looking for more involvement in their communities, and their families at the state level. >> these gun control measures that have been reported in the news are extreme and they're antithetical to the spirit of liberty. >> we want all tools available to use, including the impeachment. he's even using children. it reminds me of saddam hussein when he used kids. >> how the white house and how democrats on capitol hill pushing the various pieces of legislation, what do they emphasize. we can tell you this, the one they know is goin
the counter. it can get doctors to prescribe things. i went and got medicine. electing a demint who cured but with the case of diarrhea in madrid. that the distinction if there ever was one. later on he was thinking me for this. the phone rang. it picked up a bit of sure this person is speaking spanish. i picked it up. it was a spanish press the minister . basically a persecute person. in fact, he was going to the conference the next day in into them. a committee he called there. he said amelya would like to come upstairs to treat peptic fall. a said, but you don't want to do this, but it wouldn't be a really think to do the things he's of a protestant minister. so if you would just treat him it would be -- he would be doing a very kind act. i will let him stay more than a minute he said okay. a tall the minister, clusters. he sees instead of in the small room in his appearance. and the minister, of course, being spanish, he hesitates for a moment. did he rushes across the room and gives him a giant the back with more and had never experienced before. on the forget the look. he's looking
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)